Tag Archives: acupuncture portland

Acupuncture for Knee Pain (Part 1 Quadriceps Tendonitis)

In this article, I would like to focus on the type of knee pain that responds to acupuncture very well: quadriceps tendonitis. https://www.knee-pain-explained.com/quadriceps-tendonitis.html
The tendon of quadriceps femoris is anchored on the top side of the knee cap. The main function of this large muscle (Which actually consists of four individual muscles) is to straighten the leg. As a secondary function, it flexes the thigh, bringing it closer to the abdomen.

Acupuncture for Elbow Pain (Tennis Elbow)

A condition commonly known as tennis elbow is pain felt on the outside of the elbow. It is due to the inflammation or minor tear of the tendons that connect the forearm muscles to the elbow.
The name, tennis elbow, suggests that it is caused by tightly gripping a racket and engaging in a back hand stroke with poor technique. However, it does not affect just tennis players. Overuse of the hands and forearm may cause inflammation or minor tear of the extensor muscles on the forearm for anybody.

Acupuncture for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Carpal tunnel syndrome is basically the compression of the median nerve, caused by the narrowing of the small space called the carpal tunnel that the median nerve goes through. During my acupuncture training in school, one of my teachers told us that the problem in the wrist was never just in the wrist.
Since the median nerve originates in the neck and travels down the front of the shoulder, arm, forearm and to the hands, any inflammation and swelling of the muscles, tendons, ligament, joints, and the surrounding tissues on the path will compress on the nerve.

A Point Combination for Neck Pain, Shoulder Pain, and Low Back Pain

Because of the distribution of Triple Warmer channel and Gallbladder channel, this combination covers most problems of the muscles and joints on the lateral side of the body. This point combination is essential for the treatment of neck pain, shoulder pain, and low back pain.

Commonly-used Acupuncture Points: TW9

The name of this point is 四讀, Shi Toku (Japanese) or Si Du (Chinese). It means “Four Rivers”. Apparently, it indicates the region in China where the Yellow River and three other large rivers merge, and the name suggests “big currents”. I think it is reasonable to assume that this point is where big currents of Blood or Qi occur.

Acupuncture for Emotional Balance (Part 5)

Heart is considered the emperor of all organs in Eastern Medicine. It makes sense because when the heart stops, that is the end of one’s life. For that reason, there is no “Heart deficiency” pattern that we treat in our medicine. There is only the “Heart excess” pattern that is applicable to what we practice.

Acupuncture for Emotional Balance (Part 4)

All the organ systems are equally important in keeping the body in balance, but, for an acupuncturist, Kidney (in an Eastern Medical sense) takes precedence in the assessment of a patient. This is because Kidney is considered as the source of our vitality, controls Yin/Yang balance, plays an important role in reproduction, etc. The list […]

Acupuncture for Emotional Balance (Part 3)

A Chinese classic, Su Wen素問, indicates that pensiveness is the normal emotional state that Spleen supports. In a healthy individual, Spleen should provide good memory and mental calmness to handle affairs in a thoughtful manner. From this perspective, Spleen 脾 (in Eastern Medicine) is not just an organ; rather, Spleen represents the digestive functional unit […]

Acupuncture for Emotional Balance (Part 2)

In this article, I would like to discuss 魂 (Kon in Japanese, Hun in Chinese). This Chinese character is commonly used to describe “soul” and gives us the impression of passion and achievement when we see it. This character is often used in such context in our culture. In Eastern Medicine, the character indicates “ethereal […]

Acupuncture for Emotional Balance

When the lungs are healthy, they support the functions of 魄 (Haku in Japanese and Po in Chinese). It is difficult to translate Haku because there is no contemporary equivalence. If you can divide the concept of “spirit” into the ethereal and the corporeal, this is the corporeal aspect of the spirit.